Artists thanks Stamford community for help with project

Tim Mann's completed Crowded Room portrait of Stamford
Tim Mann's completed Crowded Room portrait of Stamford

An artist has thanked the people of Stamford for helping him with a community project.

More than 6,200 people took part in a project by Tim Mann to create the community artwork - the largest he has created to date.

Tim, 49, who grew up in the town but now lives in King’s Lynn, is well known for his collaborative ‘Crowded Room’ artworks, which see volunteers gather at a public location and stand against a huge canvas where the outline of their body is traced in charcoal.

The thousands of outlines overlap and come together to create a unique portrait of the community.

Tim said: “More than 6,200 people took part in this project and together we have shown what a great community exists within Stamford.

“The champions in each of the 14 venues we visited over the 22 days were fantastic and were instrumental in helping my team and I with the organisation of the events; we really appreciate all their help.

“The Churches Conservation Trust were so supportive in allowing us to work from a base in St John the Baptist Church and this enabled us to engage with so many visitors to the town too.

“I firmly believe that, as a result, many tourists left Stamford with the knowledge that the town really does welcome everyone – several commented to me that they loved the idea that they had left a small piece of themselves behind in the portrait and would always remember the experience.”

He also thanked local sponsors, including Stamford Town Council, Alltech, Chattertons Solicitors, Sowden Wallis, Travis Perkins, Homebase, Stamford Photo Express, Creative Design and Print and Wilkinson, which put funding and materials in place.

He was also sponsored by art supplier Derwent, which provided the fantastic Inktense Blocks used to create the portrait.

Tim said: “I really do hope that everyone who took part in the project enjoyed the experience and has taken something positive away from it.”

The completed portrait was exhibited at Stamford Arts Centre and now the exhibition has closed, Tim has gifted the piece to the town.

He also drew around people’s hands and there are limited edition copies of this collection available as well as prints of the Crowded Room portrait.

For details contact Tim via his website at www.timmannartist.com.