Bourne solar farm is connected to National Grid

Massive solar park under constuction next  A151 between Twenty and Bourne. Contact on signboard, it is next to Bourne Tractors'Photo:  SG020213-TW www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto
Massive solar park under constuction next A151 between Twenty and Bourne. Contact on signboard, it is next to Bourne Tractors'Photo: SG020213-TW www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto
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A solar farm capable of powering hundreds of homes has been completed and connected to the National Grid.

Limes Farm in Spalding Road, Bourne, is now one of the largest solar farms in the country, with 20,000 5.6MWp solar panels across 30 acres.

Lark Energy carried out final testing on the site last week before it went live.

Managing director Jonathan Selwyn said: “We are delighted the solar farm is now producing clean energy – enough to power about 1,400 homes.

“Construction started in January and it has been a challenge completing it so quickly in such muddy conditions.”

The farm has been connected to the National Grid by overhead lines, with “alternative routes” under discussion.

Mr Selwyn said: “Although the panels are in place and generating power, there is still some landscaping to be done.

“The land will also be put back to agriculture as we will be re-seeding it so sheep can graze on it.”

Neville Bish farms the neighbouring Mason’s Farm and says he has been wrestling with his conscience about whether to allow cabling through his land and accept substantial compensation.

Mr Bish said: “I’ve always been against any development taking good arable land out of production.

“Energy farms are ruining land for a fast buck.

“There’s a world food shortage – it just doesn’t make sense.

“I’m just pleased I don’t have to drive past it”.

He added: “It’s so alien to its natural environment. We’re never going to see birds, foxes or badgers on there again.

“So you see why it’s so hard for me to decide what to do.

“But if I don’t allow it they will go round, so maybe I will say yes and donate some money to charity.”

Lark Energy installed a small section of the solar farm in August, 2011 after gaining planning permission in April 2011.

The project stalled due to uncertainty surrounding the Government’s feed-in tariffs, which changed in May 2011.

The company says the Government’s renewable obligation certificate scheme has now helped to make it viable.

The scheme obliges power companies to buy a certain amount of electricity from renewable energy sources.