DCSIMG

Council ‘can’t afford’ a crossing in Thurlby

A15 Thurlby ENGANL00120140123165326

A15 Thurlby ENGANL00120140123165326

 

Villagers living near a busy A-road will have to wait for a pedestrian crossing after a council decided it couldn’t afford to build one.

Thurlby residents felt certain their campaign for a crossing on the A15 had paid off when Lincolnshire County Council began a traffic survey on the road.

They had been asking for a crossing for years but calls grew louder after 11-year-old Bourne Academy pupils Molly Williams and Willow James were hit by a minibus while crossing the A15 in nearby Northorpe in January.

Following the survey, the council announced it would build a crossing in Northorpe. But this week it confirmed that it did not have the money to do the same in Thurlby.

Head of highways in the west of the county, Brian Thompson, wrote to Thurlby Parish Council to explain the decision. He said work would start on the Northorpe crossing “towards the end of the current financial year.”

Mr Thompson added: “Currently there is no funding allocated for the crossing at Thurlby crossroads. There are other locations in the county, including locally at Morton, where crossings are under assessment and, therefore, I am unable to give any time frame for the implementation of a crossing at Thurlby.”

Parish council chairman Barry Dobson has been leading the calls for a crossing in Thurlby for many years.

He said: “It’s very disappointing. But we will keep on knocking on the door.”

After Molly and Willow’s accident, a petition was launched by Thurlby mother-of-two Clare White. More than 7,000 people signed the document calling for crossings in both Northorpe and Thurlby.

More than 150 people attended a public meeting on the issue in February.

The council acted quickly to reduce the speed limit through Northorpe from 60mph to 40mph, bringing it in line with the limit in Thurlby village. The limit between the villages was also reduced, from 60mph to 50mph.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page