New images in murder probe

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POLICE have released new digitally enhanced photographs of the man they want to speak to as part of the Alan Wood murder investigation.

Detectives leading the manhunt have had CCTV pictures of the suspects, who used Mr Wood’s cards at cashpoints in Bourne, digitally enhanced by Key Forensic Services in Coventry.

Mr Wood, 50, was found dead at his home in Main Road, Lound, in October 24, 2009 after being tortured and murdered. A £60,000 reward for information leading to a conviction is being offered.

Officers say that Mr Wood, who was last seen alive on October 21, was subjected to extreme levels of violence, possibly as his killer tortured Mr Wood to reveal his pin numbers for his bank cards.

Police believe he was disturbed at home on Thursday, October 22. They believe he was in bed reading when someone or something caused him to approach the door.

During that evening he was subjected to a brutal and sustained attack.

Seven attempts were made to use his bank cards at cash machines in Stamford and Bourne between October 22 and October 25.

Police have this week made a second appeal for information into the murder on BBC’s Crimewatch on Monday and have received more than 40 calls.

Officers released CCTV footage of a man walking along West Street. They are also hoping to track down a green Land Rover Discovery which was seen in South Street and West Street. They have been able to eliminate a man who was seen on CCTV walking in South Street.

Officers had arrested four men in connection with investigation but all four have now been released without charge. The last, a 20-year-old man, who was arrested in Hampshire in December, was eliminated from police inquiries on Tuesday.

Police are now hoping that the new series of CCTV images which were taken by cameras in Market Place, Bourne, will be able to help jog a few memories.

A Key Forensics spokesman said: “Basically we have been looking at changing the contrast and size of these images.

“Using traditional techniques both of those things would drastically reduce the quality of the images.

“If you think about your TV, if you change the contrast then the colour bleeds away.

“And if you enlarge a pixel, effectively you are zooming and not improving the quality of an image.

“We use the latest software to sharpen contrast without losing colour and instead of enlarging pixels, we effectively add more in an agreed forensically sound way that does not alter the original content of the image.

“Obviously the techniques do have limitations and their success is dependent on the original quality of the images, but we have achieved some definite enhancement here.”

The man leading the inquiry Det Supt Stuart Morrison is urging people to take a close look at the images.

He said: “The work done on these images has improved them and we need people to look at them very closely. If you think you know who this man is then please call us as soon as possible.”

Call Lincolnshire Police on 0300 111 0300.