Uppingham teenager Lauren devasted as college pulls the plug on course

Lauren Rootham, 16, from Uppingham, who was hoping to study German A-Level at Rutland County College, but was told on her induction that the college wouldn't be doing it.  Lauren pictured with her mum Elaine.'Photo: MSMP280813-011ow
Lauren Rootham, 16, from Uppingham, who was hoping to study German A-Level at Rutland County College, but was told on her induction that the college wouldn't be doing it. Lauren pictured with her mum Elaine.'Photo: MSMP280813-011ow

A teenager who spent her summer looking forward to college was devastated after being told one of her courses was no longer on offer.

Lauren Rootham, 16, from Uppingham, applied to study A-levels in German, maths, physics and geography at Rutland County College this September.

She went to induction days, was given German homework by the college and was eager to start her courses.

But when she turned up to the college the day after collecting her GCSE results she was told that German was no longer being offered for 2013/14.

Lauren, who wants to go to university in Germany, said: “I was so happy with my results. I had worked really hard and done really well.

“When they told me German wasn’t on offer it was like a bombshell had hit.

“I was so ready for it. I had done the homework. I chose the college because they offered German.

“I felt really upset when they told me.”

Lauren and her mother Elaine went home not knowing what to do.

The college later phoned to say Lauren could study German in partnership with Oakham School.

But she had been put off the college and decided to look elsewhere, settling on a college in Corby.

Rutland County College head of centre Carl Smith said all A-level courses were offered provisionally and this year just two people had applied to study German.

He added: “It’s something that happens every year at every college.

“You have to have a viable number of students.

“We don’t know until the students enrol onto their courses.”

Mr Smith said the national trend was away from German towards French and Spanish, and fewer schools were offering German courses at GCSE and A-level.