Environmental campaigners praise Mercury readers for bringing in unwanted electrical goods

Team members from e for good, from left, Corina Reay, Melinda Watson and Julia Hailes with some of the items collected at the Mercury offices in Sheep market, Stamford
Team members from e for good, from left, Corina Reay, Melinda Watson and Julia Hailes with some of the items collected at the Mercury offices in Sheep market, Stamford
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THE organisers of a pilot scheme to collect unused and unwanted electrical goods say they have been overwhelmed by the response of Mercury readers.

Environmental organisation E for Good ran a pilot scheme this week in Stamford and Grantham, asking people to donate their unused or unwanted electrical goods including kettles, toasters, TV sets and vacuum cleaners.

The Mercury has been backing the campaign and has collected at least a ton of waste at a collection point in our office in Sheep Market, Stamford.

It has been the only collection point in the area.

And organisers Melinda Watson, Julia Hailes and Corina Reay have been stunned by the backing of people in Stamford.

Julia said: “The response has been absolutely fantastic and we all would like to say a huge thank you to readers.

“The first collection on Tuesday weighed 0.85 tons and lots more items have been donated since then.

“More has been collected in Stamford than at the other collection points.

“I think it shows that many people don’t know what to do with their electrical waste.”

E for Good has teamed up with Grantham-based electrical recycling firm Environcom, which reuses or responsibly recycles the waste it receives.

As well as collecting electrical waste, the women have also spent this week raising awareness of electrical waste and the dangers it poses.

Eventually they hope to reduce the amount of electrical waste there is by talking to manufacturers about ways to reduce it, as well as introducing an eco-design award for responsibly produced electrical products.

Mercury editor Eileen Green said: “I’d like to thank everyone who has taken the time to come to the Mercury office and donate their electrical waste.

“It shows how worthwhile the pilot scheme by E for Good has been and I hope it becomes a permanent fixture in the calendar.

“I look forward to supporting it again and I will be keeping a close eye on the work of E for Good in the future.”

Yesterday, Corina, Melinda and Julia spent the day at New College Stamford working with students as part of its Green Week. The aim was to make a child replica of the WEEE man, which stands for waste electrical and electronic equipment, at the Eden Project in Cornwall, a 3.3 ton sculpture made entirely from electrical waste.