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Commissioners plan to increase tax rates as police forces face cuts

Sir Clive Loader, Police and Crime Commissioner for Leicestershire and Rutland

Sir Clive Loader, Police and Crime Commissioner for Leicestershire and Rutland

Police forces will ask the public to help make up a shortfall in funding as millions of pounds are cut from Government grants.

Ministers have decided to cut the amount of money given to forces across the country in 2014/15.

While the full details will not be confirmed until February, police and crime commissioners have taken the cuts into account when drawing up their budgets for the coming year.

Rutland residents will have to pay an extra 1.5 per cent on the police share of the council tax bill. This equates to 5p per week for a band D property.

Leicestershire and Rutland Police and Crime Commissioner Sir Clive Loader said: “The recommendation to increase council tax is not one I take lightly but is necessary due to the recent funding announcements and will ensure the county has the resources and frontline capacity to keep people safe now and in the future.”

“Local people are always telling me that visible policing is their number one priority. I want to do my best to ensure we keep bobbies on the beat and tackle local issues such as anti-social behaviour as effectively as we can. This means investing now to ease the burden we could face in the future if funding continues to decrease.”

Lincolnshire Police and Crime Commissioner Alan Hardwick also plans to increase the police precept, although he has not revealed by how much. He said: “The chief constable and I remain committed to delivering our priorities of continuing to reduce crime, making sure police and services are there when needed and ensuring our communities feel they receive a fair deal from Lincolnshire Police.”

Cambridgeshire Police and Crime Commissioner Sir Graham Bright has also revealed plans to increase the precept

The budget for Northamptonshire has not yet been set.

 

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