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Couple double their fund target in memory of their son

Got a story? Call the newsdesk on 01780 750436 or e-mail smeditor@stamfordmercury.co.uk

Got a story? Call the newsdesk on 01780 750436 or e-mail smeditor@stamfordmercury.co.uk

A couple who set out to raise £10,000 in memory of their son have raised more than doubled their target.

Andrea and Paul Scholes pledged to support the Histiocytosis Research Trust after two-year-old Oliver died of a rare blood disorder in June 2012.

They kicked off the campaign in December, 2012 and have gone on to raise £24,000 for the charity from a series of sponsored challenges and public events.

Paul, of Kesteven Road, Stamford, said: “It has been an incredible year and the support has been overwhelming. We would like to thank everyone who supported an event or donated to the charity.

“It’s really touching when people step up to help raise money and awareness.”

Oliver’s friends and family have put themselves through a number of different challenges to raise money.

Paul, a global product engineer at Cummins Generator Technologies, in Stamford took part in the Rat Race at Burghley Park while Andrea ran the Bupa 10k in London.

Other supporters have taken part in a half marathon, completed a sky dive, cut off their hair, hosted cake sales, organised bucket collections, hosted a Robbie Williams tribute night, opened their garden to the public and packed shopping in Morrisons.

The biggest money-raising event was a family fun day held in Burghley Park, which raised £5,000.

Andrea, a reporter with the Mercury, said: “2013 was a really busy year. It was great to see so many people getting involved and for us to take on challenges we would never have dreamt of doing before.

“When we started fund-raising we knew it wouldn’t make losing Oliver any easier to deal with, but it has kept us busy and the money we’ve raised will hopefully make a difference to other families.”

Oliver died of haemo-phagocytic lympho-histiocytosis a week after his brother Toby was born.

The condition affects the immune system and is treated with chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant but is often diagnosed too late for treatment to be effective. The charity funds research projects with the aim of finding a better cure.

Trust manager Lynn Jackson said: “Having the support of Andrea, Paul and their team of loyal supporters means a huge amount to us. Not only have they raised a wonderful sum of money towards our research, they have also helped to raise the profile of this devastating disease.”

To support the appeal visit www.10kforolly.co.uk

 

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