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Couple tell their story of 73 happy years

Warren and Brenda Bevan (both 93) who are celebrating their 73rd wedding anniversary at Abbey Court, Bourne. EMN-140617-160112009

Warren and Brenda Bevan (both 93) who are celebrating their 73rd wedding anniversary at Abbey Court, Bourne. EMN-140617-160112009

When Warren and Brenda Bevan tied the knot in Salisbury 73 years ago the Second World War was at its height.

Days after being married on June 14, 1941 and just a “long weekend away” for their honeymoon, the couple had to part company. Mr Bevan, a Quartermaster with the Royal Signals, was deployed to North Africa and his new bride resumed driving lorries for the Auxiliary Territorial Service.

But Mrs Bevan, who became a school teacher after the war, said she took it in her stride and did not worry about being separated from her husband because “it’s what was happening to lots of others”.

The couple, who celebrated their 73rd wedding anniversary at Abbey Court Care Home, in Bourne, marked the occasion with a “beautiful cake” made by the staff there, and in the company of their three children Philip, Clare and Rosalind and friends.

The couple have three grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

Mr and Mrs Bevan, both 93 years old, married at the age of 20 after meeting at a dancing class in North London where they lived at the time. More recently they lived in Suffolk from where they moved to the care home in Bourne, to be close to their son Philip, 62, of Southfields, who works in civil engineering.

Asked what helped their marriage last as long as it has done, Mr Bevan said: “Compatibility is the essence of any relationship.”

Mrs Bevan, who added that like any other couple “we’ve had our moments” agreed.

Common interests like music and natural history were also key to keeping them together, Mr Bevan said.

Mr Bevan played the clarinet while his wife played the piano. Their daughter Rosalind, 67, who lives in Denmark, is a professional piano player.

The couple spent their big day watching on television the Trooping the Colour ceremony, which was particularly poignant due to the anniversary of the First World War.

 

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