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Doctor of philosophy will be High Sheriff of Rutland

From left, 2016-2017 nominee Dr Sarah Furness of Whissendine, 2014-2015 nominee Miles Williamson-Noble, current High Sheriff of Rutland Trish Ruddle, and front, last year's High Sheriff Bart Hellyer.

From left, 2016-2017 nominee Dr Sarah Furness of Whissendine, 2014-2015 nominee Miles Williamson-Noble, current High Sheriff of Rutland Trish Ruddle, and front, last year's High Sheriff Bart Hellyer.

A passionate beekeeper and doctor of philosophy has been nominated for the post of High Sheriff.

Dr Sarah Furness will hold the position in Rutland for the year 2016-2017.

The nominations, announced each year at a special sitting in court 4 of the Royal Courts of Justice, in London, and presided over by the Lord Chief Justice, are made three years in advance.

Dr Furness, who has lived in the county for 25 years, has been involved with the Red Cross, Macmillan and Hope charities, She is married to Professor Peter Furness, a national medical examiner and renal- histopathologist.

Dr Furness said: “I am immensely honoured to have been nominated. Rutland is my adopted home county. It is a special place for me and my family. Rutland can provide a great quality of life. It has wonderful countryside, good schools, remarkably little serious crime, great independent shops and little traffic. I look forward to finding out more about the county and using the role to help those in need within it.”

When High Sheriff Trish Ruddle’s term ends on April 10, she will be followed by Air Commodore Miles Williamson-Noble, from Pickworth, whose air force career has included postings to RAF Wittering, Cranwell and Wyton.

The 2015-2016 nominee is chartered environmentalist Andrew Brown, a former Oakham School pupil.

The Office of High Sheriff is the oldest Royal appointment. Its origin dates back to Saxon times, Today there are 55 High Sheriffs serving the counties of England and Wales.

 

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