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Double earthquakes are rare for the UK, says seismologist

A map from the British Geological Survey showing the epicentre of Friday's earthquake. EMN-140418-110427001

A map from the British Geological Survey showing the epicentre of Friday's earthquake. EMN-140418-110427001

 

An earthquake expert has said the two tremors in the space of 24 hours is a rare occurrence for the UK.

Davie Galloway, a seismologist from the British Geological Survey, has confirmed that the area has experienced what is known as a “double earthquake” - two earthquakes of similar size in a short space of time.

A quake measuring 3.2 on the Richter scale was recorded 3.2 miles north of Oakham at about 7am yesterday (Thursday).

At about 7.50am today, a second earthquake, registered at 3.5 on the scale, was recorded 3.5 miles north of the town.

More than 600 people have filled in the online survey at earthquakes.bgs.ac.uk to say they felt today’s tremors.

Mr Galloway has said that double earthquakes are not very common in the UK and that he could not rule out the possibility of another tremor.

He said: “Today’s quake was bigger than yesterdays so we can definitely say it was not an aftershock.

“It’s what we simply call a double earthquake and they are quite rare for the UK.

“Earthquakes are so hard to predict but we may experience another one. Or it could be another 30 years before the next tremor.

“They were both a significant size for the UK but for across the globe, they were minor.”

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