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Friends act fast to save Colin’s life

Colin Crisp, from Stamford, who had a heart attack whilst at the Jolly Brewer pub enjoying his works Christmas party. Colin is pictured at home with his family. From left, back, Colin's step daughter Abigail Gibson, 15, son Liam Crisp and daughter Amy Parker. Front, Colin and his wife Michelle.
Photo: MSMP020114-004ow

Colin Crisp, from Stamford, who had a heart attack whilst at the Jolly Brewer pub enjoying his works Christmas party. Colin is pictured at home with his family. From left, back, Colin's step daughter Abigail Gibson, 15, son Liam Crisp and daughter Amy Parker. Front, Colin and his wife Michelle. Photo: MSMP020114-004ow

First-aid training proves invaluable after dad collapses from heart attack.

A father-of-three who had a heart attack at a Christmas party says he owes his life to the quick thinking of three friends.

Colin Crisp’s pals sprang into action and took it in turns to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the kiss of life for about 20 minutes while they waited for an ambulance to arrive.

Now, thanks to their quick actions and first-aid training, Colin, 62, is back home in Stamford with his wife and children.

“They saved my life,” he said. “I certainly would not be here if it was not for them. It’s so frightening when you start to think about it.”

The drama happened when Colin, the South Kesteven District Council staff member in charge of the markets in Bourne and Stamford, and eight colleagues went to the Jolly Brewer pub in Stamford for their work Christmas meal.

Paul Gatlin, a swimming instructor and former firefighters Robin Earl and Michael Eastman, were at his table. A few minutes after they took their seats Colin slumped forward on to the table. His heart had stopped beating.

The trio jumped to their feet and tried to revive him. They laid him down, cut open his T-shirt and began CPR and mouth-to- mouth resuscitation, taking instruction from paramedics over the phone until the ambulance arrived.

Colin was taken to Peterborough City Hospital and later transferred to Papworth Hospital where he was fitted with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, a small battery-powered electrical impulse generator, similar to a pacemaker.

Colin, who lives at Downing Crescent, Stamford with wife Michelle, 43, and his two teenage step-children now wants to train as a first aider so he can “help someone else in a similar position”.

“I’m just so grateful to my workmates,” he said. “Their training certainly saved me. When I met them afterwards I was so full of emotion because I knew they had saved my life.”

Michelle, an NVQ assessor at Red House nursing home in Stamford said she was indebted to the trio. And Colin’s daughter Amy Parker, 30, who works for the Evergreen Care trust added: “We will be eternally grateful to them for saving our dad’s life.”

Jolly Brewer landlady Jill Perkins also praised Colin’s colleagues.

She said they were exhausted from giving CPR but carried on for about 20 minutes until first responders, the paramedics and the ambulance arrived.

She said: “His friends were amazing. They were so calm and just got on with the job.”

Colin remains fragile and will not be able to work or drive for six months, but he is staying positive.

He said: “I have been given a second chance. I want to enjoy every day and look forward.”

 

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