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Great War centenary programme awarded £10,000 Lotto funding

Stamford town councillor Max Sawyer, mayor Brian Sumner and Steve Bonde from the Stamford branch of the Royal British Legion looking at artefacts including German field glasses, medals and the Fowke letters at the launch of the First World War Centenary Programme in Stamford

Stamford town councillor Max Sawyer, mayor Brian Sumner and Steve Bonde from the Stamford branch of the Royal British Legion looking at artefacts including German field glasses, medals and the Fowke letters at the launch of the First World War Centenary Programme in Stamford

The centenary of the First World War will be marked in Stamford with a series of events thanks to a £10,000 Lottery grant.

A team of volunteers will be running the First World War centenary programme, which will focus on the impact the war had on the town and its people.

The project will run over four years and the first year will focus on 1914, with a three-week programme of events in July at Browne’s Hospital in Broad Street, Stamford. The programme will culminate with a commemorative event at the war memorial in Broad Street to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the war on August 4.

The project is being led by Sam Roddan, from not-for-profit organisation Art Pop-Up, Max Sawyer from Stamford Town Council and Steve Bonde from the Stamford branch of the Royal British Legion.

They have received a grant of £10,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund’s Then and Now scheme. The project has also received a boost of £3,500 funding from Lincolnshire County Council’s big community fund and Stamford Town Council.

Sam said: “We are thrilled to have received the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund, as well as our local county councillors and Stamford Town Council.

“This will allow us to draw together details from the many archives, providing the opportunity for the local community to explore and understand what our town went through during this important moment in our national history and its continuing legacy and to provide a fitting commemoration to the sacrifice the community made then.”

As part of the project, volunteers will research local heritage surrounding the outbreak of the war, looking at 24 archives and sources including local newspapers, the town hall, hospital and school archives.

People from the community are being urged to get involved and roadshows are being held in Stamford in February to encourage people to share artefacts, photos and documents of their families experience of the war, as well as tales to build a clear picture of Stamford in 1914.

Schools will also be encouraged to get involved and an artist will create an installation, which will be the centrepiece of the events at Browne’s Hospital, to collage the work created by school pupils and members of social groups.

There will also be performances, activities and events, at Browne’s Hospital, where some of the artefacts discovered during the research project will be on display.

All the information uncovered be collated in a commemorative book that will be added to throughout the four-year programme to provide a lasting record of the centenary.

The roadshows will be held on Saturday, February 8, between 10am and 2pm at All Saints’ Church in Stamford; Friday, February 14, between 2pm and 4pm; Tuesday, February 18, between 2pm and 4pm and between 6pm and 8pm; and Friday, February 28, at the same times, and all at Stamford Town Hall.

Organisers are keen for as many people from the town to be involved as possible and anyone interested in getting involved in any aspect should either e-mail ww1@artpopup.co.uk or call the town hall on 01780 753808. Information will also be available by visiting www.facebook.com/StamfordWW1.

 

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