DCSIMG

Thankful Village Teigh unveils commemoration plaque

Descendants of the Tidd family Christine, Geoff and Margaret unveil the plaque to mark that Teigh is a thankful village. Photo: Alan Walters EMN-140508-105043001

Descendants of the Tidd family Christine, Geoff and Margaret unveil the plaque to mark that Teigh is a thankful village. Photo: Alan Walters EMN-140508-105043001

Teigh in Rutland is the only Thankful Village in the region - towns, cities and villages where all their men and women came home from the First World War.

On Monday, the village marked its place in history by unveiling a Welsh slate plaque set into a staddle stone on a grass verge in the centre of the village.

It simply reads: ‘Teigh 1914 - 2014 A Thankful Village’.

The plaque is in thanksgiving for the safe return from the war of its 11 men and two women.

Villager Audrey Morley, who is one of the church wardens at Holy Trinity Church, told of how the plaque came to be in the village.

“Last year, two Welshmen Douggie Bancroft and Medwyn Parry got on their motorcycles and toured the 51 thankful villages in England and Wales,” she said.

“They rode 2,600 miles over nine days, leaving an inscribed Welsh slate plaque in each place.”

On July 31 they came to Teigh, and at a short service, presented the plaque to Geoff Tidd, whose father Jack was one of the soldiers who came back home to Teigh from the Great War.

Mrs Morley said: “They also asked us if we would set up the plaque somewhere and unveil it on August 4.”

On Monday evening, following prayers by the rector of Holy Trinity Church, the Rev Janet Tebby, the plaque, which was covered in Rutland’s county flag, was unveiled by Mr Tidd, who now lives near Melton Mowbray, along with his sister Christine Wing and cousin Margaret Exton.

More than 70 people from Teigh and across Rutland attended the unveiling, along with 14 members of the Tidd family .

Mrs Morley, who lit a candle by the plaque to conclude the service, said the unveiling of the plaque had “awakened interest” in the Great War among the village’s younger people.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page