Memorial commemorating the Second World War is set to be restored at last

Barbara and Don Parker with the Williamson Cliff war memorial bricks that are stacked in their garage
Barbara and Don Parker with the Williamson Cliff war memorial bricks that are stacked in their garage

THERE is fresh hope that a memorial which a couple salvaged could be rebuilt and put in Stamford Cemetery.

Barbara and Don Parker, of Pembroke Road, Stamford, spent months in 2004 and 2005, rescuing pieces of a memorial commemorating people who served in the Second World War.

The memorial had stood in the Williamson Cliff brickworks office in Casterton Road, Stamford, but was damaged when the offices were demolished in 2004.

Mr and Mrs Parker both had uncles named on the memorial and decided the memorial was too important to lose.

They have had the pieces stored in their garage since then while they were applying for grants and looking for people to help fix the memorial.

Now the construction department at New College Stamford has stepped in and offered to help.

Director of learning in construction Gary McPartland has examined the memorial and said students could help put it back together. They will be collected in February.

Mrs Parker is delighted the memorial could finally be rebuilt.

She said: “We were very lucky to find so many names and although we didn’t find everything, it will be good to see it back together again.

“I am pleased it could be restored. I think it is a nice piece of history, not just for us but for everyone in Stamford.”

The couple have enlisted the help of Charles Clark from the War Memorials Trust to help them apply for grants as they believe that even with the help of New College Stamford students, there could be a cost in replacing the missing pieces and getting a structure to support the memorial built.

Stamford town councillor Max Sawyer is backing them and has approached the council with the idea of putting the memorial in the cemetery in Casterton Road, Stamford.

Mr and Mrs Parker hope the town council will maintain it.

Coun Sawyer (Ind) said: “The memorial is important because it reminds people that the majority of those who served were working in ordinary jobs.”