New plans for the Bourne Corn Exchange on display

Bourne Corn Exchange Officers Andrew Seymour and Richard Wyles from SKDC and partner organisations speak to residents about the proposals
Bourne Corn Exchange Officers Andrew Seymour and Richard Wyles from SKDC and partner organisations speak to residents about the proposals

RESIDENTS turned out to see displays of how the Bourne Corn Exchange will be transformed into a one-stop-shop for council and community services.

South Kesteven District Council laid out plans for the public to see on Monday of how the development will look when complete.

More than 40 people visited the display to see computer generated images of the development and speak to council officers about the proposals.

The project, which will cost more than £260,000, will bring a range of council services under one roof, including the library, the county, district and town council offices and the Citizens Advice Bureau, as well as function rooms.

Leader of the district council, Coun Linda Neal (Con), said: “I am thrilled that so many people came along to this event which gave residents a real insight into what the building will look like once the work has been completed.

“I hope that now people have seen the final plans that they will get behind the project, which I think is vital for Bourne.”

Work on the facility is due to start on Monday.

Development on the ground floor includes building a new customer service facility, a library, and interview rooms.

The main function room on the ground floor, with kitchen and changing rooms, will still be hired out and town council meetings will be held in the building.

Staff offices will be installed on the first floor and the current living accommodation at the centre will be converted for offices and storage.

The services are currently held at the town hall, in North Street, and library, in South Street, and following the move the buildings will be left unoccupied.

Lincolnshire County Council has previously expressed they may look to sell the properties to private developers if they find no other use for them.

Gary Porter, network manager for Lincolnshire County Council, said: “For library customers, the move will mean improved opening hours, better parking and a newly-refurbished home, making it easier to visit at a time that’s convenient for you.

“Hopefully this will encourage even more people to make use of the service.”

Developer Burmor Construction from Deeping St James has been appointed to carry out the work, which should be completed by March next year.

The development of the Corn Exchange is part of a wider large scale scheme to develop the town, which includes transforming the area of land around Wherry’s Lane and Wherry’s Mill.