Concern over eco-home proposal on land next to Stamford’s Meadows

The site next to the Freeman's Meadow in Stamford where Roger and Christina Tallowin hope to build an eco-house. Photo: MSMP240914-001am
The site next to the Freeman's Meadow in Stamford where Roger and Christina Tallowin hope to build an eco-house. Photo: MSMP240914-001am
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Concerns have been raised over a couple’s plans to build an “eco-house” on land next to Stamford’s historic Freeman’s Meadow.

Roger and Christina Tallowin have applied to South Kesteven District Council to build the home on land off Austin Friars Lane in Stamford.

The environmentally-friendly home would feature a ground source heat pump, solar panels and “living walls” covered in plants.

The land is unused and only has a couple of dilapidated sheds on it. But some nearby residents have raised concerns that building on the land would set a precedent for development next to the Freeman’s Meadow.

“It’s part of a historic and most famous view from Stamford, looking up from the Meadows to the town,” said magazine editor Nicholas Rudd-Jones, who lives in Austin Street.

Mr Rudd-Jones is part of a group of people concerned about future implications of the development.

He said: “If a precedent is set then you could easily put another property in the garden of Meadow Cottage. And you could also build on the allotments.

“If you want something to stay as it is you shouldn’t let a hole in the damn develop.”

Plans for a similar home on the site by different applicants were turned down by South Kesteven District Council. The applicants appealed but a planning inspector upheld the council’s decision in 2006.

At the time the inspector said it was “impossible” to draw any visual distinction between the site and the Meadows.

The report said: “Overall I consider that the extraordinary beauty and character of the town Meadows would be seriously compromised by the encroachment into the appeal site that would result from permitting even this well designed building.

“Thus great harm would accrue to an almost unique townscape feature that forms a major physical element of an attractive and historical town.”

The application acknowledges the site’s planning history, and also concedes that the home would be in a flood zone. But it says the applicants “believe that this site can deliver a special home for them and something special, in terms of concept and design for historic Stamford that does not compromise important views and would in fact enhance this derelict site.”