Sarah Outen completes record-breaking Pacific row

Sarah Outen arrives in Adak after completing solo Pacific row. Photos James Sebright
Sarah Outen arrives in Adak after completing solo Pacific row. Photos James Sebright
0
Have your say

Rutland adventurer Sarah Outen become the first person to row solo from Japan to Alaska last night (Monday).

Former Stamford High School pupil, Sarah, 28, from Oakham, arrived in Adak in the Aleutian Islands, at 11.35am local time (9.35pm UK time) yesterday, after a voyage of 3,750 nautical miles.

Sarah Outen arrives in Adak after completing solo Pacific row. Photos James Sebright

Sarah Outen arrives in Adak after completing solo Pacific row. Photos James Sebright

Sarah rowed to within half a mile of land but the prevailing winds, waves and current were pushing her onto the rocks that circle the coves.

Her support boat, with ocean manager Tony Humphreys and photographer James Sebright on board, towed her the final distance into port.

An emotional Sarah said she cried and grinned as she rowed the final strokes to shore

Sarah said: “I have had some of the most intense and memorable months of my life out on the Pacific - it has been brilliant and brutal at the same time.

“It has been a privilege. I have pushed myself to my absolute limits both physically and mentally to make land here in Alaska, and body and mind are now exhausted.”

Sarah and her boat, Happy Socks, left Choshi, Japan on April 27 and made land on Adak Island, off the coast of Alaska 150 days later.

The during the row Sarah passed the halfway mark on her wider expedition, London2London: Via the World, a challenge to circle the globe by her own power alone.

Sarah’s initial route of Japan to Canada was changed as she had been battered by continued contrary winds and adverse weather, which had severely hampered her progress eastwards.

As conditions worsened she decided to change course and head north for Alaska, the safest and quickest route to land.

Sarah is the only woman to have even attempted to row solo from west to east across the Pacific Ocean.

The journey has been filled with highs and lows. While on the ocean Sarah got engaged to her girlfriend, Lucy Allen, popping the question via Satphone. But she also faced storms which confined her to her cabin for days and her boat has capsized five times, bringing back memories of being hit by the row-ending Tropical Storm Mawar during her first attempt to cross the Pacific in 2012.

Sarah said: “I am so grateful to everyone for supporting my return after Mawar - sponsors, family, friends at home and in Japan and my team.

“Without them I wouldn’t be here. I am solo only physically – there are a lot of people on my boat with me.”

The row is part of Sarah’s longer expedition, London2London: Via the World, which sees her row, kayak and cycle a loop of the planet. Before crossing the Pacific, Sarah kayaked and cycled 11,000 miles from London to Japan.

Following her arrival in Alaska, she will fly back to the UK for rest and to prepare for the next leg of the journey.

In the Spring of 2014, she will return to the Aleutian Islands and with team mate, Justin Curgenven, to kayak through the archipelago to mainland Alaska. From there she cycle across Canada and North America, before rowing solo across the Atlantic back to the UK by autumn 2015.

Sarah is also hoping to raise more than £100,000 for her four chosen charities – CoppaFeel!, MND Association, The Jubilee Sailing Trust and WaterAid.

To donate visit her Virgin Giving page