Stamford gardens under water after pump breaks

Flooding in the back garden of Bill Christie's home in Ravel Close, Stamford. Photo by Gavin Christie
Flooding in the back garden of Bill Christie's home in Ravel Close, Stamford. Photo by Gavin Christie
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Homes were saved from thousands of pounds of damage by firefighters after a water pump broke down causing gardens to flood.

Residents of Ravel Close, Stamford, were amazed to see their street and gardens turn into mini lakes during heavy rain on Monday evening.

Flooding in the back garden of Bill Christie's home in Ravel Close, Stamford. Photo by Gavin Christie

Flooding in the back garden of Bill Christie's home in Ravel Close, Stamford. Photo by Gavin Christie

The homes are on high ground and do not normally suffer from flooding. But on Monday a pumping station that usually takes rainwater away from the estate did not do its job.

Gavin Christie, 36, was visiting his parents Bill and Sue when the water began to rise.

He said: “Water from the whole estate ended up in the back garden. It was an inch away from coming in the house.

“It was over the whole garden. It’s crazy, really.”

Firefighters were called and a crew rushed to the scene to help. It took 20 minutes of pumping to steady the flow, by which point the Christies’ shed and garage had flooded.

The open space in Ravel Close and a section of the street also flooded. Gavin said if the rain had carried on for another five or 10 minutes then the water would have gone into people’s homes.

Thankfully the actions of the fire service managed to prevent what could have caused thousands of pounds of damage.

But Bill, 64, said tools and other items in his garage and shed worth hundreds of pounds had been ruined.

He added: “I’ve lived here for 10 years. This is the first time it’s happened, and hopefully the last.

“It was like a waterfall coming over the fence.”

Initial investigations by the fire crew suggested the flooding was caused because the pumping station to the rear of the Christies’ home had broken down.

Gavin said a door on the station which is usually locked was wide open on Monday evening.

After several phonecalls he discovered the station is the responsibility of Bloor Homes, which has a regional office in Northampton.

Engineers on site on Wednesday said a switch had tripped some time ago and were looking into why it had not been fixed.

In the meantime the Christies are cleaning up the mess.

Gavin said: “It’s caused a lot of stress and grief and it could have been avoided.”