Time to return planter in Stamford to its former glories

The large planter outside St Michael's churchyard in High Street, Stamford
The large planter outside St Michael's churchyard in High Street, Stamford

A community group has secured grant funding to repair a large town centre planter that is in danger of collapsing.

Stamford Urban Group came up with a plan to revamp the large brick fixture in High Street after noticing the structure was cracking and falling apart.

Their repair plan, which includes reinforced concrete and new lighting, is likely to cost about £8,000.

And after some dispute about who should pay for the work, Stamford Town Council decided on Tuesday to grant the money from a fund bequeathed by a former resident.

Chairman of Stamford Urban Group Don Lambert said: “We had a planter that was severely disintegrating that could end up as a health and safety hazard.

“If that wall collapsed there is a likelihood that the earth could fall out, and the trees might as well.

“The roots are pushing the thing out, so we decided to do something about it.”

The plan involves cutting back the trees to make them safe before widening and reinforcing the planter.

New lights would be installed to illuminate the trees, and the overgrown plants underneath would be removed.

The group hopes to retain the original motifs on the current brickwork, pictured right.

Mr Lambert said the plans were initially drawn up in November last year.

But a dispute between the town, district and county council over who should 
pay for the work meant funding was only secured on Tuesday.

Mr Lambert said he was relieved the matter had finally been resolved.

He added: “We can now look at what needs to be done. The idea is in place and we now have to find a time to do it.”

While the cut-back trees will initially look a bit bare, they will soon grow back. And the urban group hopes the repaired and revamped planter will once again become a highlight of the High Street.

Mr Lambert said: “Because it is getting in such a bad state it reflects badly on the town.”

It is hoped work will begin next year.