Tomorrow’s world is today for The Deepings School

Historian, writer and broadcaster Dr Jonathan Foyle opens the new �4 million science centre at The Deepings School where he was a student between 1981 and 1986.  Joining Dr Foyle are sixth form students Ruby Silk and Louise Sturman (front), chairman of governors Jonathan Theobald, headteacher Richard Trow, school site manaher Dave Jessop and school business manager Lisa Goodchild.  Photo by Tim Wilson.
Historian, writer and broadcaster Dr Jonathan Foyle opens the new �4 million science centre at The Deepings School where he was a student between 1981 and 1986. Joining Dr Foyle are sixth form students Ruby Silk and Louise Sturman (front), chairman of governors Jonathan Theobald, headteacher Richard Trow, school site manaher Dave Jessop and school business manager Lisa Goodchild. Photo by Tim Wilson.
  • Science centre heralds new era for non-selective secondary school

A new £4 million science centre at The Deepings School could unearth the next generation of Isaac Newtons, Michael Faradays and Albert Einsteins.

That is the hope of staff, governors and guests invited to the official opening of the new centre by ex-Deepings School student and historian Dr Jonathan Foyle.

Science teacher Craig Walton demonstrates sound waves with fire at The Deepings School.  Photo by Tim Wilson.

Science teacher Craig Walton demonstrates sound waves with fire at The Deepings School. Photo by Tim Wilson.

The opening took place just hours before the second Lincolnshire Free Press and Spalding Guardian Education Awards and guests were shown some of the 11 laboratories, 90-seat lecture theatre and atrium containing new, state-of-the-art IT equipment.

Headteacher Richard Trow said: “This incredible, amazing science centre has grown up extremely quickly over the last year and I’m privileged to be headteacher at a time when we can create facilities like this.”

Student Tara Qureshi (17) said: “It’s exciting to use the new facilities and to have the opportunities here which are almost as good as a university.

“If someone takes any kind of interest in one of the sciences, they should go for it here because it’ll be more interesting, especially if you want to know how things work.”

Year 8 students Evie Spittlehouse, Siobhan Donnell and Lucy Smith dissect owl pellets, watched by teacher Carolyn Grieg.  Photo by Tim Wilson.

Year 8 students Evie Spittlehouse, Siobhan Donnell and Lucy Smith dissect owl pellets, watched by teacher Carolyn Grieg. Photo by Tim Wilson.

In opening the new centre, Dr Foyle said: “The facilities at The Deepings School are superb and the school’s achievements and ethos are tremendous.

“The world these students have inherited has seen the triumph of science in bringing photos of Pluto, showing water on Mars, finding cures for diseases and keeping us from hunger.

“At the same time that we witness many challenges ahead for our planet, Deepings School students will doubtless cultivate not only the skills to assess evidence about the material world, but take with them the ‘sixth sense’ of science.

“An honesty that assures the veracity of the work they take pride in and what a fine opportunity they now have.

Sixth form biology students James Ralph and Tara Qureshi dissecting a heart and lung in one of the new science classrooms.  Photo by Tim Wilson.

Sixth form biology students James Ralph and Tara Qureshi dissecting a heart and lung in one of the new science classrooms. Photo by Tim Wilson.

“With curiosity, application and honesty, they will excel.”

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