Video: Restored war memorial rededicated

A war memorial commemorating those who served in the Second World War has been rededicated during a ceremony this morning (Tuesday).

The Williamson Cliff memorial is now standing at Stamford Cemetery and Stamford Town Council organised an hour-long ceremony to rededicate it.

Re-dedication of the Williamson Cliff war memorial at Stamford cemetery - Some of the people involved in the project, from left, Andrew Bannister, ian Redhead, Max Sawyer and Gary McPartland'Photo: MSMP130613-070js

Re-dedication of the Williamson Cliff war memorial at Stamford cemetery - Some of the people involved in the project, from left, Andrew Bannister, ian Redhead, Max Sawyer and Gary McPartland'Photo: MSMP130613-070js

The memorial once stood in the brickworks in Casterton Road but was destroyed when the building was demolished in 2004.

It was salvaged by Barbara and Don Parker, along with dozens of volunteers including Ray Lee, who spent months going through rubble to retrieve pieces of the memorial, which named members of staff from the brickworks who served during the war including six who were killed.

Mr and Mrs Parker struggled to find the grants and the help needed to restore the memorial and it was only when Stamford town councillor Max Sawyer stepped into help, that the restoration began.

It is now standing on a new surround with a leaded roof and the pieces that were too damaged to be repaired have been replaced.

During the rededication ceremony, there was a flypast by two Austers and a Tigermoth, flown by members of the Barnack and District branch of the Royal British Legion, readings by Coun Sawyer and Stamford mayor Brian Sumner and hymns.

The Last Post and Reveille were also played and there were representatives there from RAF Wittering, the 16th Regiment Royal Artillery from St George’s Barracks, Stamford Combined Cadet Force and the Stamford branch of the Royal British Legion.

The families of those named on the war memorial were also invited.

Siblings Margaret Baines, Ann Britten and Lee Gibson, whose father Arthur Gibson is named, were there.

Mrs Baines said: “It’s amazing to see it here. I only wish our father was here to see it, he would have loved to have been here. He was fortunate, he managed to come back from the war and he worked at the brickworks.

“He was very proud to be named on the war memorial and it is so nice that people still remember them and have gone to the time and effort to do this.”

Mrs Britten added: “It is somewhere now where we can come and remember our father. The memorial looks fantastic.”

Coun Sawyer thanked all those who had made the restoration possible including Mr and Mrs Parker, staff and students at New College Stamford and contractors Babcock.