Ancient Greyfriars Gateway repairs could cost £50,000 at Stamford Hospital

Greyfriars Gateway, a monument at Stamford Hospital, which the trust is restoring after a review by English Heritage. Stamford Hospital matron and site manager Sue Brooks in front of Greyfriars Gateway
Greyfriars Gateway, a monument at Stamford Hospital, which the trust is restoring after a review by English Heritage. Stamford Hospital matron and site manager Sue Brooks in front of Greyfriars Gateway
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A HOSPITAL trust has set aside £50,000 to restore an ancient gateway.

Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals Trust will spend the cash on repairs to the Greyfriars Gateway at Stamford Hospital in Ryhall Road, Stamford.

It follows a report by English Heritage which said the 14th century gateway, which is a scheduled monument, was at risk.

The trust is now taking advice on how to rescue the building from further deterioration and preserve it for future generations but the money has been allocated for repairs to the roof, stonework and interior.

Site manager and matron of the hospital Sue Brooks said: “Stamford Hospital has a 200-year history itself but we are on a site that is much older.

“The gateway is part of our site and it is vitally important that we maintain it, partly because of its heritage and partly because we use the building.

“I am fully in support of spending the money. I know it is not about patient care but it is about the environment we create for our patients.”

Mrs Brooks is chairman of the Stamford Hospital Heritage Committee, which runs the hospital’s museum.

She added: “I suspect a lot of people don’t notice it when they are whizzing around the mini-roundabout but it is a scheduled monument. I am really pleased it will be restored.”

The gateway is the only remaining part of a friary that stood on the hospital site from 1220 until the dissolution of the monasteries by King Henry VIII in 1539. Stamford Hospital opened in 1828 thanks to a bequest by local surgeon and benefactor Henry Fryer and in 1847 a bequest from a Stamford resident provided money for a porter’s lodge to be built on the side of the gateway.

The porter, John Hissett, lived in the lodge with his wife Abigail, who was also hospital laundress, and their daughter Sarah, who was born in 1843. Sarah Hissett grew up at the hospital and later became hospital matron from 1869 to 1904.

Today, a Victorian sampler worked by Sarah when she lived at the hospital as a child is one of the exhibits in the hospital museum, which opened in August 2010.

The gateway was used as a pedestrian entrance to the hospital until the 20th century and was scheduled as a nationally important ancient monument by English Heritage in 1986.