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Culture Recovery Fund money awarded for restoration of Lion Bridge at Burghley Park, near Stamford



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An attraction near Stamford has received a £400,000 boost of Government funding.

Burghley Estate is among the 142 historic sites across England to receive grants through the Government’s £35m Culture Recovery Fund and the second round of the Heritage Stimulus Fund.

The grant will fund the restoration of the Lion Bridge within Burghley Park, designed by renowned 18th Century architect, Capability Brown, and built in 1778.

Lion Bridge in Burghley Park. Photo: Lee Hellwing
Lion Bridge in Burghley Park. Photo: Lee Hellwing

The works will secure the structure for at least the next 100 years and address its deterioration.

David Pennell, chief executive at Burghley, said: “We are very grateful for the funding which has been awarded through Historic England.

“While keeping the parkland open to the community throughout the pandemic provided a welcome space for the community, closures to the house and gardens and the cancellation of events through 2020 and 2021, resulted in a severe loss of income.

Lion Bridge in Burghley Park. Photo: Lee Hellwing
Lion Bridge in Burghley Park. Photo: Lee Hellwing

“This is revenue that would have been spent on vital restoration projects and the preservation of Burghley’s heritage assets.

“Receiving this funding means that we are now able to carry out the works to the Lion Bridge ensuring it can remain open to the community and preserved for future generations to enjoy.”

The Lion Bridge was built from Ketton and Lincolnshire limestones in 1778 and spans the lake at Burghley.

Restoration will start later this month and end in June. It will involve wrapping the bridge in a scaffold and weatherproof sheeting, removing the tarmac surface, repairing and cleaning stonework, and fixing the ironwork.

Lion Bridge in Burghley Park. Photo: Lee Hellwing
Lion Bridge in Burghley Park. Photo: Lee Hellwing

The project will use locally contracted companies working alongside in-house tradespeople and with guidance from Historic England.

Duncan Wilson, Historic England’s chief executive, said: “Funding is hugely welcome at a time when the people and organisations who look after our vast and varied array of heritage urgently need support to carry out essential repairs.

“Heritage is a fragile eco-system, with an amazing cast of characters who keep our historic places alive, with specialist skills that take time to learn and experience to perfect.

“These grants will protect their livelihoods, as they use their expertise to help our heritage survive.”



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