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Butchers look to chop away plastics use




Co-proprietors Hannah Campbell, left, and Joy Dawson with their new packaging
Co-proprietors Hannah Campbell, left, and Joy Dawson with their new packaging

The co-owner of a Manthorpe butcher estimates she will save around 100,000 plastic bags per year by using alternative, recyclable packaging.

Hannah Campbell, from Mill Farm Butchers, is on a mission to reduce the business’s single-use plastic consumption by swapping plastic bags, tinfoil and cling film for paper bags, greaseproof paper and beeswax wraps.

“As farmers, we see quite a lot of plastic bags and bottles on our land and seeing the Sir David Attenborough series made me think about our plastic consumption and to do this,” said the 33 year-old who owns the butchers alongside her mum, Joy Dawson.

“For small businesses, it is quite expensive to do but it is something we feel very strongly about.

“We have got paper carrier bags now and greaseproof paper instead of cling film and tin foil and also beeswax wraps.

“These are made of cotton, pine resin and beeswax and you can reuse them by washing them and then hanging them out to dry.

“They have been really popular with our customers.

“I’d say about 80 per cent of our packaging is recyclable and it’s been really well received.”

In fact, the beeswax wraps were so well received, the butchers almost sold out of them during the first week they were introduced.

Areport from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs from July this year, found the seven major retailers issued around 83 per cent fewer plastic bags (over six billion bags fewer) between April 2016 and 2017 when compared to the calendar year 2014.

Research by the University of California found that 40 per cent of plastic produced is packaging used just once and then
discarded.

Hannah said that most of her customers are now bringing in re-usable bags and that it has become ‘normalised’ now.

“I would say that most people are on board with what we are trying to do,” she
said.

“For a small business in an even smaller village, I reckon we’re pretty pioneering.

“And I certainly haven’t heard of any butchers locally taking these
steps.”



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