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Helipads for Hospitals finally get a bin installed in Stamford at the Cattlemarket car park




Following a Mercury story, a recycling bin which collects cans to be turned into hospital helipads has been installed in a town’s car park.

A red collection bin for Helipads for Hospitals is located at the Cattlemarket car park in Stamfordand was unveiled on Saturday (January 11) last week by president of the Rotary Club of Stamford St Martin’s, Geoff Collett and founder of Helipads for Hospitals, John Nowell.

John, a retired RAF helicopter pilot from Oakham, said: “This is the cumulation of 18 months of hard work.

From left, president of the Rotary Club of Stamford St Martin's, Geoff Collett, with club member, Colin Gibbon, and his carer
From left, president of the Rotary Club of Stamford St Martin's, Geoff Collett, with club member, Colin Gibbon, and his carer

“We are going to try to get these bins across the whole of the Midlands and this is one more achievement.

“Everytime we get another one in, it’s just fantastic.”

After a story appeared in this newspaper in November appealing for a spot in Stamford to place the bin, South Kesteven District Council agreed it could be put in the Cattlemarket car park.

Rotarian Katy Harrison puts the first can in the bin
Rotarian Katy Harrison puts the first can in the bin

John added he was in discussions to get a bin at the Corn Exchange in Bourne and another in Market Deeping.

As both the Leicester Royal Infirmary and Queen’s Medical Centre in Nottingham do not have helipads for air ambulances to land, John came up with the idea of collecting the cans so they can be transformed into helipads.

He added: “After the Kegworth air disaster in 1989, both Accident and Emergency departments at the Leicester Royal Infirmary and Queen’s Medical Centre were swamped.

“It was recommended that all of them should be equipped with a proper helipad - that was 30 years ago - and it still hasn’t happened.”

The cans will be used to build a rooftop helipad on a soon-to-be built building at the Leicester Royal Infirmary.

Collected cans are taken to Stocken Prison where the inmates crush them into pallets which are melted down and turned into parts of the helipad.

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