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Dementia diagnosis rises in Rutland and South West Lincolnshire




The number of people diagnosed with dementia has drastically increased over the past five years in Rutland and Lincolnshire.

The area covered by the NHS's South West Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), has seen diagnosis rise by 78 per cent since April 2014 - a jump from 639 people to 1,136.

The CCG of East Leicestershire and Rutland has seen a similar trend, with cases rising from 1,446 to 2,049.

Professor Sube Banerjee, executive dean at Plymouth University’s Faculty of Health, professor of dementia and old age psychiatrist
Professor Sube Banerjee, executive dean at Plymouth University’s Faculty of Health, professor of dementia and old age psychiatrist

This is not necessarily a bad thing - increased diagnosis means more people can potentially receive the correct treatment.

A spokesman for NHS England said: “Spotting dementia in a timely way means people get the care they need, when they need it, so it’s good news that thanks to concerted efforts nationally and locally the NHS is now diagnosing more people than ever before, beating the target we set ourselves."

Tracy Manning, manager at The Willows Care Home in Rippingale, explained how dementia affects people in very different ways. Some people live through a trauma on a daily basis whereas others relive their childhood.

People on England's dementia register per 10,000 population by Clinical Commissioning Group in 2019
People on England's dementia register per 10,000 population by Clinical Commissioning Group in 2019

She mentioned that one resident at The Willows still believes that she is living in the 1940s and so often asks about the planes - such as those in the Second World War.

Tracy also stressed the importance of speaking to a patient's family to find out what they were like previously.

She said: "We have a lady who is quite stern and authoritative and after speaking to her family it made it quite clear to why she was like it."

Lots of individuals at The Willows are funded by adult social care, but the amount of money they are given depends on their financial situation.

Dr. Karen Harrison Dening, head of research and publications at Dementia UK
Dr. Karen Harrison Dening, head of research and publications at Dementia UK

Tracy said: "I know Government funding is quite short but adult social care is quick to react if someone is in trouble."

In 2012, the Government launched an initiative to increase the diagnosis rate of dementia as part of David Cameron's Prime Minister's Challenge.

At the time, it was estimated only 40 per cent of those living with the condition had been officially diagnosed.

The number of people on the dementia register in England has risen from 332,000 to 470,000 in five years, an increase of about 41 per cent throughout the country.

Ewan Russell, head of policy and campaigns at Alzheimer’s Society, said: “Across the board we are seeing increasing numbers of people living with dementia and simply not enough support is being provided.

“Alzheimer’s Society has published a report this week from the London School of Economics that shows that by 2040 the number of people living with dementia will have doubled, but the costs of care for those people is going to triple.

"It is heartbreaking and not right that people with dementia have to battle to get the care that they need," he added.

“The Government has to step in and boost people’s support.

Dementia care costs the UK just under £35 billion per year, two thirds of which is paid for by families rather than the Government.

Dr Karen Harrison Dening, head of research and publications at Dementia UK said: “Care at the moment is very hit or miss. There are no standardised services across the country so it is still very much a postcode lottery as to what care and support you might receive.

“A third of us will die with or from dementia. This is an issue that needs tackling now,” she added.


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