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Rutland Lions donate magic table to help dementia patients at Rutland Care Village in Oakham




A community group treated care home residents to a new piece of technology designed to keep the mind and body active.

Rutland Lions delivered the Tovertafel Magic Table to Rutland Care Village in Oakham.

The equipment includes a box which is mounted on the ceiling and projects light games onto a table below with infrared sensors, a speaker and processor.

High Sheriff of Rutland, Margaret Miles, and former Rutland Lions president Julie Rolland try out the games
High Sheriff of Rutland, Margaret Miles, and former Rutland Lions president Julie Rolland try out the games

The games encourage players to reach out towards the table to make the lights respond to hand and arm movements.

Former club president Julie Rolland spearheaded the project during her year in office.

She came across a video of the magic table online and realised how much the Rutland community would benefit from one.

Rutland Care Village residents try out their new magic table watched by former Rutland Lions president Julie Rolland and care home manager Piotr Batory
Rutland Care Village residents try out their new magic table watched by former Rutland Lions president Julie Rolland and care home manager Piotr Batory

She said: "My mother had dementia and as soon as I saw this, I knew it was a great idea.

"Rutland Care Village has the biggest dementia group in Rutland but it will benefit the whole community who can arrange to go in and use it."

The High Sheriff of Rutland, Margaret Miles, went along to the care home with members of Rutland Lions last Thursday to unveil the new table.

The games include making flowers grow and sweeping up leaves.

Caroline Scott, far right, teaches residents how the magic table works
Caroline Scott, far right, teaches residents how the magic table works

The table was designed in the Netherlands to help people with dementia and was brought to the UK by the social enterprise company Shift8.

It cost £6,000 which came from the Rutland Lions funds but Julie believes it will be worth every penny.

She said: "People in the later stages of dementia can just sit and watch the lights, but others may suddenly start to communicate with a neighbour.

"For those who still have some language it also has word games. There's something for everyone.

"It's great for getting people to sit together and do something together."

Care home manager Piotr Batory was thrilled to receive the donation which he believes will make a big difference to the care home residents.

He said: “The technology is great because it involves the brain and the limbs.

“We have been using the table daily in the day centre before we move it into our dementia unit.

“We’re grateful to the Lions for thinking of us and donating the table to a private company."

Read more news from the Rutland and Stamford Mercury.



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