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Pet safety in summer: Animal healthcare and expert advice at Priory Veterinary Practice in Stamford, Lincolnshire


By Mercury reporter


SPONSORED EDITORIAL

Summer is here, the garden chairs are back out and the holidays can finally start.

But what have you done to make sure your pet is safe and also able to enjoy the occasion with you?

Although most wild animals know how to handle hot temperatures, the same cannot always be said of pets.

Imagine yourself in their paws and think how hot you’d feel if you wore a fur coat on a baking hot day!
Imagine yourself in their paws and think how hot you’d feel if you wore a fur coat on a baking hot day!

Here’s some food for thought from one expert on keeping your pets safe during those hot summer months.

“We’ve seen temperatures soar in Europe as well as here in the UK so it is vital that people with pets keep this mind and keep this in mind,” said Vicky Lees who owns Priory Veterinary Practice in Stamford.

“Not all pets dislike the heat; some love it but they can often find the wrong place to enjoy the sun.

“You need to make sure that they’re not kept in spaces that trap heat like a conservatory or a greenhouse and especially never a parked car on a hot day.

Try and avoid taking your dog out in the midday sun.
Try and avoid taking your dog out in the midday sun.

“Even keeping a pet in a hot car for just a few moments can lead to a fatal heatstroke.

“It’s also worth remembering that animals with short noses such as Pugs and Persian cats struggle to pant effectively and are more in danger than other animals.”
CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ANIMAL HEALTHCARE AT PRIOR VETERINARY PRACTICE

Some of the early warning signs of heatstroke include panting, drooling, vomiting, diarrhoea, lethargy and a rapid heart rate.

Having plenty of fresh water, and avoid letting them run around outside during the hottest parts of the day is another good way to ensure that they don’t overheat or dehydrate.

Heat is not the only thing to be wary of in the summer when it comes to your pets.

Priory Veterinary Practice Stamford is an independent family run practice formed by Veterinary Surgeon Vicky Lees.
Priory Veterinary Practice Stamford is an independent family run practice formed by Veterinary Surgeon Vicky Lees.

The increase in temperature also leads to a rise in the presence of summer insects such as fleas and ticks which is why it’s so important to make sure flea and worming treatments kept up-to-date and not neglected or delayed.

“Bugs can carry diseases and cause irritations to pets but there are also other dangers to pets when it comes to insects, mainly from the way certain people try to ward them off,” continued Vicky.

“The use of Fertilisers and pesticides to keep bugs away in your garden can be very dangerous for your pets. It’s better to simply cut your grass short to deter insects.”

Slugs and snails are a common garden pest but can also be dangerous for cats and dogs

“Some infected larvae found in infected snails, slugs or frogs - and which are sometimes eaten by animals - contain a parasitic worm called lungworm that live in the heart and blood vessels that supply the lungs,” she added.

It's important to ensure your dog has access to plenty of clean drinking water all year round, but especially in the summer.
It's important to ensure your dog has access to plenty of clean drinking water all year round, but especially in the summer.

“Lungworm is becoming more common but is also easily preventable.”
CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ANIMAL HEALTHCARE AT PRIOR VETERINARY PRACTICE

Using pellets to deal with slugs and snails is not the best solution. This is because those pellets are sometimes eaten by pets and can pose a serious health risk.

And it’s not only insects, parasites or repellents that are harmful.

Lilies, azaleas, tulips and foxtail weeds may look harmless and pretty but they can be fatal for cats and dogs if they eat or even come into contact with them.

Unripe, green or raw potatoes and tomatoes can also be dangerous to pets.

Make sure your cats have access to shade and plenty of drinking water during the day.
Make sure your cats have access to shade and plenty of drinking water during the day.

“It is always a good idea to plan a routine health check in summer to discuss preventative healthcare.”

An independent and family-owned business, Priory Veterinary Practice offer Health Care for Life and Flexible Health plans that are designed to ensure that all pets get the veterinary care that they need.

For more information, visit Priory Veterinary Practice’s official website by clicking here.



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