Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

New King Street quarry near Greatford, Baston and Langtoft approved by Lincolnshire County Council despite HGV concerns and 160-plus objections




Plans for a new quarry near Greatford were given the go ahead on Monday despite traffic safety concerns of adding HGVs to a busy 'rat run'.

Lincolnshire County Council’s planning and regulation committee approved plans to convert 55 hectares of agricultural land off King Street to the extraction and processing of gravel and sand.

The quarry, which will lie within a mile of Greatford, Baston and Langtoft, will produce around 200,000 tons annually for about 16 years before it is restored to agricultural land and a nature conservation area.

An HGV is forced to mount the verge and tailbacks form as two lorries struggle to pass along King Street. Photo: Vanessa Smith
An HGV is forced to mount the verge and tailbacks form as two lorries struggle to pass along King Street. Photo: Vanessa Smith

Conditions were added to reduce noise and dust pollution, and to prevent HGVs from using local villages and hamlets.

With an estimated 70 to 80 HGV movements per day, committee members also added an amendment to widen a 1km stretch of King Street - between the quarry entrance and its junction with Stowe Road - to 6m instead of the 5.5m proposed after plans drew more than 160 objections.

Simon Tucker, agent for applicant Dr Charles Lane, said further widening of the road, used as a cut-through between the A15 and A1175, would risk increasing speeding problems and accidents along King Street.

The site for the new quarry which will produce 200,000 tons a year of sand and gravel. Photo: Robin Jones
The site for the new quarry which will produce 200,000 tons a year of sand and gravel. Photo: Robin Jones

Among the objectors was Vanessa Smith who told the committee that widening the road by 10cm, as originally proposed, was ‘ludicrous’.

Calling for a 40mph speed limit or new access, she said: “It is already an unlit, undulating, ungritted straight, fast pot-holed, deathtrap of a road with blind junctions used by hundreds of commuters, but often avoided in winter because it's already too hazardous."

Coun Ashley Baxter, Lincolnshire County Councillor for Deepings West and Rural, added: “The road is already a rat run and a combination of lorries, cyclists and cars is not a healthy one. The traffic needs to slow down.

Applicants say the land will be restored to agricultural use after 16 years. Photo: Robin Jones
Applicants say the land will be restored to agricultural use after 16 years. Photo: Robin Jones

“The issue of lorries passing is an important one and one which will either cause accidents or congestion.”

Coun Gemma Taylor, of Greatford Parish Council said there had been 23 collisions on King Street in five years and described the development as 'inappropriate' for the location.

“It is clear from the local parish councils and more than 160 local objectors that the applicant has got this really wrong," she said.

Planning committee member Marianne Overton said the site visit had helped them visualise local concerns.

“I would think (HGVs) passing at speed quite close is a very risky situation, especially when there might be a cyclist there on the same road at the same time,” she said.

“It’s not complicated, it's not expensive, it's not difficult and it's an opportunity we should take to get that road a little wider so that cyclists and lorries can use it.”



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More