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History of Leicestershire and Rutland Police - changes during the Queen's reign



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A police force has charted the changes seen under the 70-year reign of the Queen.

All officers still swear allegiance to Queen Elizabeth II, something bobbies did back in 1952 too.

But there have been many changes, and Leicestershire and Rutland Police have dug back into the archives to take a look.

WPCs in their 1950s uniforms (57074293)
WPCs in their 1950s uniforms (57074293)

In 1952:

  • The force took on 22 Morris Eight cars
  • The force was in two - Leicestershire and Rutland Constabulary and Leicester City Police, and as such there were two chief constables – John Albert Taylor was chief of the counties force and Oswald John Buxton Cole was chief of the city force
The former City Police headquarters in Charles Street, Leicester, on Coronation day (57074290)
The former City Police headquarters in Charles Street, Leicester, on Coronation day (57074290)
  • The city had 256 officers and the county had 420
  • Mobile police stations were in action, having being introduced in 1951
  • Police boxes were still being used by officers to meet members of the public
  • The first woman special constable, Edna Taylor, joined as a volunteer
A mobile police station (57074287)
A mobile police station (57074287)
  • Uniform was different for men and women, with WPCs given skirts, heels and a handbag as part of their uniform.

In 2022:

  • The force became Leicester and Rutland Constabulary in 1967, before changing again 1974 to Leicestershire Constabulary. The change to Leicestershire Police came in 2013
  • 2,242 officers police a 2,500sq km area, with the support of 200 community support officers (introduced in 2002) and 1,200 police staff roles
Insp Lindsey Booth of Rutland Police wearing modern uniform
Insp Lindsey Booth of Rutland Police wearing modern uniform
  • The force area is split into nine Neighbourhood Policing Units
  • Uniform is unisex, with force-issue trousers and shirts being worn by both men and women. Stab vests are worn when officers are on patrol and every officer has a body-worn video camera to record interactions and collect evidence
  • Technology has changed the way crimes are committed and solved. Mobiles, the internet, computers and smart phones mean crimes committed digitally place a huge demand on police time, and digital evidence often contributes to prosecutions
Officers such as PC Joe Lloyd of Rutland Police now use video and social media to keep the public informed
Officers such as PC Joe Lloyd of Rutland Police now use video and social media to keep the public informed
  • CCTV, online banking and DNA profiling with fingerprints and bodily fluids have all been developed.
Sgt Paul Kear retains the traditional helmet when he's on patrol in Rutland
Sgt Paul Kear retains the traditional helmet when he's on patrol in Rutland


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