Home   News   Article

Suspected drug factory found at home




A man was arrested at a home in Stamford after police suspected he had a drug factory in his garage.

Police were called to the home in Highgrove Gardens on April 25, after a large amount of chemicals were found in the home, which when combined could be used to produce illegal drugs.

Police have revealed to the Mercury the man's wife discovered the chemicals in the garage and then reported her discovery to police.

The man has been arrested and bailed pending further enquiries by police.

Ian Martin, community policing inspector for Stamford, Bourne and the Deepings, said: "We found a amount of drugs which which when mixed could be mixed to make drugs.

"Somebody was arrested for that but our enquiries are still ongoing in relation to it. By themselves they are not dangerous items.

"We found the selection of chemicals in the garage belonging to her husband.

"It is suspected that a person was involved in the production of controlled drugs."

The stash of seven different types of chemicals includes a litre of acetic acid and a quantity of both sulphuric acid and bromicide.

Inspector Martin added that the chemicals were not explosive and not dangerous to people unless they came into close contact with them.

The man was charged with suspected manufacture of a scheduled substance, knowing or suspecting it could be used in the unlawful production of a controlled drug.

After the drugs were discovered, the house was cordoned off by police at both the front and rear of it and the home was immediately evacuated as police feared for the residents safety.

Police worked with the fire service to removed the chemicals from the property the next day.

Inspector Martin added: "Police officers assessed the chemicals and the fire service came down.

"The property was evacuated and officers were brought in to guard it overnight."

If you have information about the incident call police on 101, quoting incident reference number 391 of April 25.

Alternatively if you would prefer, you can contact Crimestoppers anonymously by calling 0800 555 111.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More