Home   News   Article

England ICC Cricket World Cup Winners Jonny Bairstow and Chris Woakes used Gray-Nicolls bats made from willow from Brudenell Estate's land at Deene Park near Stamford




Deene Park played a role in England’s special Cricket World Cup victory last month.

Jonny Bairstow and Chris Woakes’s Gray-Nicolls bats are made from willow that comes from the trees on Brudenell Estates’s land at Deene Park.

Although both players had a quiet game during England’s stunning super over victory by virtue of scoring more boundaries over New Zealand in the final at Lord’s on July 15, Bairstow had a good tournament with the bat.

Deene Park willow trees
Deene Park willow trees

He scored centuries in games against India and New Zealand and finished as the tournament’s sixth highest run scorer with 532 runs.

A spokesman for Brudenell Estates, said: “Since the estate obtained an unconditional felling licence in 2014, we have been supplying Gray-Nicolls with the very best willow for the production of cricket equipment.

Making a cricket bat
Making a cricket bat

“A cultivar of the white willow, salix alba, var – caerulea, has been grown specifically for cricket equipment in several locations around the estate.

“The trees have been carefully selected for their size and suitability, with more willow being planted annually to allow for future generations to excel on the cricket pitch.

“A willow tree takes, on average, up to 18 – 22 years to become fully fledged before being cut down and transported to the Gray-Nicolls factory in East Sussex.

“Each year, two members of the Brudenell Estate staff measure each of the suitable trees (using a special item for measuring each tree) for size as this will determine which of the trees could be suitable for chopping down and being made into a cricket bat.

“Generally you can get an average of three and a half cricket bat lengths from each tree.”

Other players using Gray-Nicolls bats include New Zealand captain Kane Williamson and former England captain Alistair Cook.


More by this author



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More